How to deal with cracked tooth?

Bllomfield dental center - Blog - How to deal with cracked tooth
Bloomfield dental center – Blog – How to deal with cracked tooth

In this post, we will talk a little about having a cracked tooth and how to deal with it.
Although our teeth are very strong but they still can get cracked, chip or even break, here are how it could happen to anyone.

  • Having a weak tooth due to a cavity.
  • Neglecting an old amalgam fillings that doesn’t support your tooth.
  • Biting down on something very hard.
  • Falling or being hit in the face.

Types of tooth Fractures and breaks

1. Craze lines
When examining teeth for cracks, keep in mind that most adult teeth have craze lines. In posterior teeth, craze lines are usually evident crossing marginal ridges and extending along buccal and lingual surfaces. Craze lines, such as those on the occlusal surface of this tooth, are sometimes mistaken for other types of cracks. Long vertical craze lines commonly appear on anterior teeth. As they only affect the enamel, they cause no pain and are of no concern beyond the aesthetic.

 

2. Fractured Cusp
The term fractured cusp is defined as a complete or incomplete fracture initiated from the crown of the tooth and extending sub gingivally, usually directed both mesiodistally and buccolingually. The fracture usually involves at least two aspects of the cusp by crossing the marginal ridge and extending down a buccal or lingual groove. The fracture will extend to the cervical third of the crown or root.

 

3. Cracked Tooth
A cracked tooth is defined as an incomplete fracture initiated from the crown and extending sub gingivally, usually directed mesiodistally. The fracture may extend through either or both of the marginal ridges and through the proximal surfaces. The fracture is located in the crown portion of the tooth only or may extend from the crown to the proximal root. Cracked teeth are described as incomplete (greenstick) fractures, which also describes their form.

 

4. Split Tooth
The term split tooth is defined as a complete fracture initiated from the crown and extending through both of the marginal ridges and the proximal surfaces. The fracture is located coronally and extends from the crown to the proximal root. A crack that is more centered on the occlusion will tend to extend more apically. A split tooth is the evolution of a cracked tooth; the fracture is now complete and extends to a surface in all areas. The root surface involved is in the middle or apical third, usually extending toward the lingual. There are no dentin connections; tooth segments are now entirely separate. The split may occur suddenly, but it more likely results from long-term growth of an incomplete cracked tooth.

 

5. Vertical root Fracture
A “true” vertical root fracture is defined as a complete or incomplete fracture initiated from the root at any level, usually directed buccolingually. The fracture may involve one proximal surface or both buccal and lingual proximal surfaces. The fracture is located in the root portion of the tooth only, and may extend coronally toward the cervical periodontal. A VRF may extend the length of the root or occur as a shorter crack at any level along the root. The crack may or may not extend to both buccal and lingual surfaces.

 

Whether your tooth cracks from an injury or general wear and tear the pain may come and go and your dentist may have difficulty locating the tooth causing the discomfort. If you experience these symptoms or suspect a cracked tooth, it’s best to contact us at Bloomfield Dental office in Cerritos, CA and make an appointment to see our endodontist as soon as possible.
Here are five dental procedures that can be done to repair your cracked tooth

  • Dental Bonding.
  • Veneers.
  • Crowns.
  • Root Canal.
  • Dental Implant.

At Bloomfield Dental center in Cerritos, CA we will determine which procedure is best for you and your case.